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A Project Manager’s Favorite Books

by Rachel Mignoga

Building the industry bookshelf one recommended read at a time.

These books inspire me to keep learning about myself and the world around me, increasing happiness both inside and outside of work!

Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear, by Elizabeth Gilbert

Big Magic is a deep dive into the author’s unique perspective on creativity, offering tips on staying mindful and bringing more wonder and passion into your life.

We believe everyone is uniquely creative here at redpepper and this book, for me, supports my objective to continue to lead a creative life at work and outside of work.

“Do whatever brings you to life, then. Follow your own fascinations, obsessions, and compulsions. Trust them. Create whatever causes a revolution in your heart.”

Daring Greatly, by Brené Brown

Daring Greatly does a great job of showing that when we shut ourselves off from being vulnerable, we distant ourselves from all the experiences that bring purpose and meaning to our lives that we were once missing.

I dropped everything and moved to Nashville a few months ago and to actually make the move took a lot of courage! This book helped me in that situation and will continue to as I go through my career and in my life outside of work. We always need to have the courage to be vulnerable. That’s when the most opportunities arise and we learn the most about ourselves. We must not stand on the sidelines but dare to show up and let ourselves be seen.

“Vulnerability sounds like truth and feels like courage. Truth and courage aren’t always comfortable, but they’re never weakness.”

Thinking, Fast & Slow, by Daniel Kahneman

Thinking, Fast & Slow takes readers on a tour of the mind, shedding light into the idea that there are two systems that work together; one fast and one slow.

As a project manager, there are times where I need to think and act fast and then sometimes planning of a project or task requires more focus. This book helps to understand the differences between thinking fast and slow and the benefits or disadvantages of both. Having a better understanding of the mind and how we think allows us to make better decisions.

“You are more likely to learn something by finding surprises in your own behavior than by hearing surprising facts about people in general.”

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